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Fire safety on ferries guide issued by the Standard P&I Club

To raise awareness, the Standard P&I Club has published a 36 page guide about fire risks on ferries.
To raise awareness, the Standard P&I Club has published a 36 page guide about fire risks on ferries.

To raise awareness, the Standard P&I Club has published a 36 page guide about fire risks on ferries. This type of ship presents particular risks due to the cargo onboard, including cars, lorries and refrigerated containers. All of these have combustible material and are fire hazards in their own right.

There are numerous causes of fire but the most relevant ones to ferries are:

– Electrical defects, such as overloaded electrical equipment, damaged cables and poorly formed connections. – Electrical faults in vehicles, especially when engines are hot/running. Reefer containers are major sources of fire.
– Mechanical failure, such as ignition from overheated bearings or a catastrophic engine failure.
– Uncontrolled release of oil or flammable liquid coming into contact with a hot surface, or the release of a low flashpoint fuel, such as petrol vapour, coming into contact with a source of ignition.
– Dry, readily combustible materials (such as wood, paper, textiles) coming into contact with an ignition source, – such as a lighted cigarette, sparks or conducted heat from burning or cutting, highintensity lights or defective electrical equipment.

Things to do

– Ensure that the integrity of structural fire protection is maintained and that it is not compromised during repair and/or modification.
– Make sure penetrations in compartment boundary bulkheads and decks are fire safe.
– Identify where emergency cables run and check that they are adequately protected from fire.
– Have a programme to test fire detectors and alarms so that they are all tested in rotation. Record the results in the log book(s).
– Have a programme to test fixed firefighting system(s) so that the entire system is tested every month. Record the results in the log book(s).
– Hold realistic fire drills followed by a through debrief in accordance with SOLAS.
– Familiarise all crew with the firefighting equipment and the potential means for fire to spread from compartments.
– Test the emergency fire pump and emergency generator during fire drills, ensuring that all crew become familiar with their operation.
– Send all crew on an advanced firefighting course.
– Keep garage spaces clean and free from combustible material, such as oil, paper and rags.
– Keep scuppers clean and free from debris. Water deluge systems can release large volumes of water.
– Stow dangerous goods safely in the properly designated area.
– Fully close fire doors and ramps, and have measures in place to ensure they remain fully closed.
– Have a continuous fire patrol giving special attention to potential fire hazards, such as operating reefer containers/equipment and vehicles with hot engines.
– Investigate every lighted ‘open fire door’ indication lamp.
– Investigate every fire alarm.
– Promptly report the discovery of fire.
– Promptly fight fire, in accordance with training.
– Be afraid of smoke – it’s toxic.
– Be afraid of CO2 – it’s an asphyxiant.

Things not do do

– Cut holes in compartment boundaries or thermal insulation.
– Modify bulkhead or deck pipe and cable penetrations without correctly reinstating fire stopping.
– Paint over release nozzles in a sprinkler, deluge, CO2 or high fog extinguishing system.
– Store oil in drums, wood, paper, oily rags or similar combustible material in garage spaces or in spaces without a fixed fire detection and extinguishing system.
– Wedge a fire door open or disable a door position indicator lamp.
– Allow passengers in vehicles when the ship is navigating, except on those very short voyages where passengers remain in vehicles.
– Smoke, or permit smoking, except in dedicated smoking areas.
– Disable fire detectors or fire alarm zones, without putting alternative precautions in place.

Click to download the 36 page guide: Standard-Club-A-masters-guide-to-fire-safety-on-ferries

The post Fire safety on ferries guide issued by the Standard P&I Club appeared first on The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS).

PLA place order for the first UK hybrid pilot boat

The new hybrid vessel is due for delivery spring 2019
The new hybrid vessel is due for delivery spring 2019

The Port of London Authority (PLA) has ordered the UK’s first hybrid pilot boat from Goodchild Marine in bold move to help meet climate targets.

The ORC 136.HY is a parallel hybrid pilot boat, which will combine both diesel and electric power and has been designed to be completely emission-free when operating in electric mode.

The PLA has placed the order as it starts to deliver on the commitments in its recently published Air Quality Strategy for the tidal Thames – also the first of its kind for any UK Port.

Among the 18 proposals for action is a commitment to encourage the installation of green technology.

Goodchild Marine Services Limited, a family-run business in Burgh Castle, near Great Yarmouth – whose ORC flagship range lends itself to incorporating hybrid power – is partnering with EP Barrus for the Yanmar engines, and transmission specialists, Marine and Industrial Transmissions Limited for the Transfluid Hybrid system, to deliver a plug-in diesel hybrid pilot boat.

The hull will be based on the established ‘ORC’ design, developed by French naval architects Pantocarene and adapted by Goodchild Marine for the UK market.

ORCs feature a ‘beak’ bow design, which aims to give the design unmatched all-weather capability.

The new hybrid vessel is due for delivery spring 2019.

15 KNOTS ON HYBRID POWER
The new pilot cutter, which is expected to reach up to 15 knots under hybrid power, will be used by the PLA for the transfer of pilots to and from vessels in Gravesend Reach.

Alan Goodchild, Managing Director of Goodchild Marine Services Limited, said the company was delighted to respond to developing technology and market interest.

“There are lots of hybrid boats on the market, but in my opinion, not like this. It’s down to the application, the speed it must reach, where it operates and the time it’s working over the course of the day, which means it is a challenge to achieve.

“Passenger boats, such as ferries are low speed on a pre-determined duty cycle and there are times they can be plugged in and re-charged.

“Pilot boats however, can be erratic on duty cycle and speed requirements, so to achieve 15 knots under hybrid power is a leap and perhaps why no-one else, to the best of my knowledge, has gone for it.”

Marine and Industrial Transmissions Limited (MIT) and its manufacturing and technology partners Transfluid will provide the hybrid system.

John Logue, Managing Director of MIT, said: “Our manufacturing and technology partners Transfluid have invested heavily in the development of our plug and play electric/hybrid system and have numerous reference projects around the world. However the PLA project is unique in that it is a first for a UK pilot vessel and will operate at speeds up to 15 knots in electric mode.”

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IIMS and BSSA to deliver a special one day seminar entitled Marine Corrosion and its Prevention in Amsterdam November 2018

Following the huge success of the first corrosion seminar delivered by Mike Lewus, British Stainless Steel Association, which attracted nearly 60 delegates (both real-time and online) in January, IIMS has decided to run the programme again in Amsterdam on 27th November 2018.

Mike Lewus from British Stainless Steel Association (BSSA) will deliver this essential one-day seminar called ‘Marine Corrosion and its Prevention’. The day’s seminar programme will be delivered on 27th November at Park Inn by Radisson by Amsterdam Schiphol Airport commencing at 09.00. Delegates who cannot be there in person may join online live via Zoom.

Who should attend?
This seminar suits marine surveyors, marine engineers designers, coatings inspectors and specifiers interested in material degradation mechanisms in the marine environment and selecting fit-for purpose materials.

An outline of the day
This one-day course gives a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles of corrosion and forms of corrosion that beset marine metals including, stainless steels, aluminium alloys, copper/nickel and titanium alloys. The types of corrosion commonly found above and below the waterline of vessels and the factors which influence the rate of degradation are considered. For completeness protection methods, elements of failure analysis and illustrated case studies are to be discussed.

What will you learn?
– Recap on fundamental corrosion principles including, the driving force for electrochemical activity and principles of galvanic corrosion
– An understanding of the corrosion mechanisms that undermine the performance of stainless steel and other ‘marine metals’ and associated metrics
– An appreciation of what environmental factors influence corrosion above and below the waterline and how this impacts material selection
– Consider how to minimise corrosion through material selection, improved design and other strategies i.e. cathodic protection, changing electrode potential, surface treatments etc.
– Become familiar with important aspects of failure analysis; inspection, sample preparation, analytical techniques and diagnostic methodologies

The day’s course will be delivered in six sections as follows:
1) Corrosion: Fundamental Principles
2) Forms of corrosion in ‘marine metals’
3) Corrosion above the waterline
4) Corrosion below the waterline
5) Corrosion prevention strategies
6) Failure analysis and case studies

About Mike Lewus, your seminar tutor
Mike is an undergraduate from Sheffield Polytechnic, and a PhD in Materials Engineering at Loughborough University of Technology. His professional working life began with research posts in USA – Virginia Poly. Institute & State University and UVa (University of Virginia), followed by 25 years steel related R&D experience at Swinden Technology Centre (British Steel/Corus/Tata Steel), Rotherham. This was followed by 4 years at the University of Sheffield, AMRC (advanced manufacturing research centre) and most recently as technical advisor at BSSA.

Delegates will take away a significant course manual, videos of the modules delivered on the day and a certificate of attendance. Members can also claim 5 CPD points.

The cost of the day, to include all course materials, lunch and refreshments is just £130. Please indicate if you will be there in person, or if you plan to join in an online capacity.

To reserve your place on this one-day seminar, simply complete the form below and we will invoice you.

The course flyer can be downloaded here

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The post IIMS and BSSA to deliver a special one day seminar entitled Marine Corrosion and its Prevention in Amsterdam November 2018 appeared first on The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS).

Volvo aiming to have a new self-docking system ready by 2020

The self-docking system is centred around a joystick-controlled Volvo Penta Inboard Performance System (IPS)
The self-docking system is centred around a joystick-controlled Volvo Penta Inboard Performance System (IPS)

In a live demonstration of the self-docking system, which can be seen in the video below, a 20.7-metre (68-foot) motor yacht fitted with the technology was able to automatically and safely dock in a compact space between other vessels.

The self-docking system is centred around a joystick-controlled Volvo Penta Inboard Performance System (IPS), which is a comprehensive integrated propulsion system. The automated docking procedures are viable thanks to the on-board electronic vessel control system (EVC), which calculates steering power, speeds and the boat’s exact location. It also interacts with four sensors positioned in the berth for maximum accuracy.

As well as being able to safely secure a boat into a berthing space, the automated system can also help it depart with ease.

The pioneering new device is aligned perfectly with Volvo Penta’s ‘Easy Boating’ philosophy, with the company seeking to eliminate the frustrations that can arise when attempting to manoeuvre into narrow berths, or while winds or sea conditions are unfavourable.

Björn Ingemanson, president of Volvo Penta, commented, “Docking is one of the most challenging boat handling manoeuvres – getting it wrong can be embarrassing, expensive and precarious. Our IPS system has already taken great strides in making docking easier, and this new self-docking feature takes that process one important stage further.

“Its sensors and on-board computers react in milliseconds to changing wind and sea conditions, constantly making micro adjustments in power and steering angle of the IPS drive to keep the boat on its intended course into a safe berth,” Ingemanson added. “If necessary, the docking process can be paused, and the system will hold the boat stationary in the water. Even in changing sea conditions it can make the sea appear to stand still.”

The system works in three phases: It will first acknowledge entering a ‘catch zone’, pinging a signal that it is ready to dock to the captain. Once the captain activates the self-docking system, the boat – aided fully by GPS – automatically moves into a ‘ready’ position. Then, when the captain initiates the final phase, the system uses a combination of processes and sensors (on board and in the port itself) to safely dock the boat.

Johan Inden, chief technology officer at Volvo Penta, explained, “We have long had the ambition to make docking as easy as possible. The first step towards this was in 2006, with the launch of our joystick docking technology. This was followed by the introduction of the Dynamic Positioning System, which automatically maintains a boat’s heading and position, even during strong currents or windy conditions – ideal when preparing for docking.

“Now, we are taking the next important step by enabling the boat to dock itself. With our easy docking concept, we aim to attract more people to enjoy the boating experience.”

The self-docking system will be compatible with advanced IPS-equipped boats, but a retrofit version is also being planned for the wider market. Initially, it will be available to owners and individuals who can fit private docks with the system, but ultimately Volva Penta are hoping that this technology will be of interest to marinas, harbours and ports of all sizes.

Although the self-docking system is largely automated, Volvo Penta has deliberately designed it to require human input and therefore not be totally autonomous. Captains will need to remain at the helm during the process – although anti-collision alerts are in place and the system can provide avoidance manoeuvres if necessary.

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Flexible mobdock repair method for underwater shaft seal repairs developed by Hydrex

Damaged stern tube seals will cause an increasing amount of oil leaking or water ingress as the damage worsens
Damaged stern tube seals will cause an increasing amount of oil leaking or water ingress as the damage worsens

Hydrex has developed a flexible mobdock repair method that enables the underwater replacement of all types and sizes of shaft seals. This technology has been successfully used by Hydrex diver/technicians for over a decade. It allows ship owners to keep their vessel sailing, saving precious time and money.

Damaged stern tube seals will cause an increasing amount of oil leaking or water ingress as the damage worsens. By replacing the seals when the damage is first discovered, Hydrex keeps the down time low. The ship can keep its schedule as seal repairs can be performed during cargo operations. This is done by creating a dry underwater working environment around the shaft.

It is not always straightforward to replace seals, because there can be quite a bit of variation in the configurations of the stern tube itself. There can also be complications with the liners, which can be worn down and show ruts. All this is routinely handled by Hydrex teams on the jobs.

In this article you can find a short summary of some of the recent stern tube seal repairs Hydrex has carried out. Like all shaft seal repairs offered, these were performed in cooperation with the OEM. This allows Hydrex to provide customers with original spare parts which guarantees the best quality material. Hydrex usually supplies the equipment but the owner is free to supply his own OEM seals. Hydrex can handle all type of seals from all manufacturers.

Recently a Hydrex diver/technician teams carried out an underwater stern tube seal repair on a tanker berthed in Antwerp. The ship was suffering from an oil leak, making an on-site repair necessary.

Once the operation was approved all preparations were handled swiftly and the lightweight equipment was mobilized almost immediately. The team was on-site and ready to start the seal replacement when the vessel arrived in Antwerp.

The operation started with a thorough underwater inspection of the stern tube seal assembly. It was revealed that a rope and a fishing net were entangled around it. Both were removed by the divers and the flexible mobdock was installed to allow for work in dry conditions. The team then removed the three damaged seals and replaced them with new ones.

After the seals had been successfully replaced, the owner could sail his vessel to her next stop free of oil leaks. Despite the vessel’s location close to the Hydrex headquarters in Antwerp the well-stocked fast response center nevertheless saved the owner a costly and unwelcome trip to drydock.

A team of divers traveled to Veracruz, Mexico for a stern tube seal repair. The operation consisted of the underwater replacement of the damaged seals on both assemblies of a semi-submersible offshore platform.

The unit left the field after its project was finished and was berthed alongside to have repair and maintenance work carried out without docking. Hydrex was asked to perform the stern tube seal repairs during the available window of opportunity.

After the diving team performed a thorough underwater inspection of the assembly they installed on of the flexible mobdocks. Next they removed the four damaged aft seals one by one and replaced them with new ones. The two forward seals were also replaced during the repair. The six seals of the starboard side assembly were then given the same treatment.

A Hydrex diver/technician team carried out underwater stern tube seal repairs on a 138-meter LNG tanker during the vessel’s stop in Singapore. The ship’s stern tube was suffering an oil leak, making a quick on-site repair necessary.

As a result of Hydrex’ many years of experience, the technical department was able to offer a repair plan to the customer very quickly. Once the operation was approved, all preparations were handled swiftly and the lightweight equipment was mobilized from our fast response center almost immediately. Within a matter of days the diver/technicians were on-site and ready to start the seal replacement.

During the operation the team removed the three damaged seals and replaced them with new ones. A technician of the seal manufacturer was present during the operation to give his approval of the repair.

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